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A Day Well Spent


“You spot for Daddy while I back the trailer down into the water, Sweetie.”

“Okay, Daddy!” she says excitedly. She’s a big girl and likes to help out with these things. So I let her out of the car seat and let her stand up in the back seat.

Both hands on the seat back, Stinkerbell,” I remind her. “I don’t want you falling over if I have to stop suddenly.” Dutifully, she raises her stiff little left arm and slowly, agonizingly extends it, propping it on the seat back.

I’m not going to be stopping suddenly, and she can hold on just fine with one hand, but that’s not the point. She needs to work on arm extension.

I back the trailer into the water, set the parking brake and get out. I let her out of the back seat and lead her to the water’s edge. She sits down in the shallows as I wade out and pull the jet ski back to shore.

“Catch the rope, Sweetie!” I call out, tossing her the tether line. The coiled line splashes her and she giggles. I tossed the line to her left, so that she has to twist her torso to the left and rotate her weight over her left hip to reach it. That’s why I threw it where I did.

She reels in the line, hand over hand, because that’s how big girls do it. At least that’s what I tell her. The alternating movements help her build coordination.

She can’t really grasp the line in her left hand, the fingers clenched in a tight, spastic little fist, so she compensates by pinning the line to her left thigh and dragging it back with her clenched fist. She’s a smart little girl, and thus very good at finding ways to compensate. She’ll always figure out the easy way to do something.

But easier is not always better, and so I’m always after her to do things the right way. It tries her patience sometimes.

Hauling in the rope soaks the splint on her left hand, but I don’t much care. It’s made of neoprene, after all.

Not fifteen minutes ago, the clerk at the convenience store asked her about the splint. The clerk, like everyone else who meets KatyBeth, was taken by her blue eyes, politeness and infectious enthusiasm, and cooed sympathetically when she saw her splint. “How did you hurt your hand, sweetie?”

“I have cewebwal palsy,” KatyBeth said matter-of-factly. “I have a bwace on my weft ankle, too!”

The clerk closed her mouth with an audible snap and blushed like a tomato. I winked at the clerk as I took my change and turned to go.

“Thank you, Ma’am!” KatyBeth called out as we left. “Me and my Daddy are gonna go wide the jet ski and cut up!”

And just like that, the clerk went from embarrassment and pity back to being totally enchanted by my kid. She’s good at that.

I gently beach the jet ski on the shore next to the landing and urge KatyBeth up the steep concrete ramp. It would be easier for her if I held her hand as she walks. It would be easier for me to just put her back in the truck for the drive back to the parking area. But walking this incline works her leg muscles and encourages her to shift her weight forward over her pelvis.

“Hurry up,” I chide teasingly, goosing her in the left butt cheek. She giggles and totters faster. For her, it’s a goose in the hiney and a fun game. I happen to know that a simple physical cue like that promotes better hip and leg extension, and lengthens her stride. Her limp becomes less noticeable.

At the top of the landing, I park her on a picnic bench and hustle back down to my truck. I quickly pull the truck up to the parking area and choose a space. I have my pick of spots because we’re the only people out here today, but I pull well down the parking lot anyway.

I park the truck and lock the doors, and call KatyBeth over. “Time to put on your life jacket!” I call out. “Get your little booty over here!” I watch as she slowly pivots around and worms her way backward off the bench. She has to extend both arms in order for her feet to touch the ground.

She totters across the rolling lawn, carefully negotiating the uneven ground. There are closer parking spaces, ones that would have necessitated only a short walk across dry pavement, but the uneven grassy surface is more of a challenge. Besides, KatyBeth likes the grass.

At the truck, I pull off her tee shirt and shorts, and quickly remove her shoes and ankle brace. On go the Dora the Explorer aqua shoes and sunglasses to match her Daddy’s. I make her lift her arms over her head to slip the life jacket on. It would be just as easy to work around her left arm, tucked in at her side as it is, but this way we have to do arm extension. Always, always we work on arm extension.

I take her hand as we walk down the ramp. Her aqua shoes don’t offer the best ankle support, although the sole of the left shoe is a bit stiffer, thanks to an insert I fashioned for it. Her life jacket makes her a bit top heavy as well. Falls are things we expect her to deal with, but I’m not going to set her up for one.

We wade out into the water, and I stow the collapsible cooler in the storage compartment, zip my keys and wallet into a Ziploc bag and toss them in on top of everything else. KatyBeth stands in the water, holding on to the aqua-step on the back of the jet ski. She looks pensive.

She’d rather not climb onto the jet ski herself. She remembers what happened last summer, when she lost her footing on the step and bashed her mouth on the boarding handle. We both remember the terror in her cries as the blood ran down her chin into the water.

But picking her up and carrying her around does not teach her independence, and so we will do this the hard way. She has to reach up with both hands and grasp the grab rail, and lift one foot and place it on the step. From there she can step up into the foot well and make her way along it to her spot up front.

I carefully open her left hand and wrap the fingers and thumb around the grab rail, and hold it in place as she boosts herself up. I cried harder than she did the last time, because I knew that she had fallen because I got careless.

I will not be careless again.

I lift her onto the seat and get her settled in, and push the jet ski away from the landing. I clamber on board behind her, fit the lanyard of the kill switch around my left wrist, and turn on the choke. KatyBeth wants to work the throttle, as usual.

Instead, I make her press the start button, as usual. I know her right hand works just fine. She needs to use the left hand. So I encourage her to extend her hand and engage the starter, which she does, laboriously extending her left arm and pushing the button with the knuckle of her index finger. Opening her hand all the way requires supreme concentration. I am happy if she simply tries.

The jet ski roars to life and she squeals in delight. I let her work the throttle now, since she’s itching to do it anyway. It’s her reward. She pauses and looks back at me. “Say it, Daddy!” she prompts.

I grin as I wrap her left hand around the handle bar and fit mine over it. I plant my feet, pull her close against me and say what I always say.

“Git it, Katy!”

Cackling gleefully, she gooses the throttle, my jet ski rockets forward with an angry snarl, and soon we are scooting down river at nearly fifty miles an hour. Katy’s grin meets in the back, and her ponytail whips at my face.

I let her steer, taking care to keep her left palm firmly pressed to the handlebars. The vibration is good feedback for those dormant nerve pathways we’re trying to awaken. We do lots of right turns to, once again, extend that left arm, and we also do plenty of flat spins to the left, to teach her to shift her weight.

And for the next few hours, I am alone on the river with my daughter, and we play with a purpose. We do flat spins. We do 360’s. We leap
our own wake. We nose dive and the water cascades over our knees before the Kawasaki overcomes its downward inertia and leaps from the water like a broaching marlin.

And my daughter laughs.

We zoom about, and I let go the handlebars now and then and let her steer. We go left, and we go right. Occasionally, she cuts it a little hard, and we wipe out.

But that’s okay, because then we can swim for a little while, and then practice getting back on. Sometimes she’d rather swim when I’d rather ride. She always wins.

It’s hard for KatyBeth to swim wearing this life jacket. The thing is designed to roll her onto her back and support her head, and it takes some doing to roll onto her stomach. When she kicks, she gets excited and the spasticity kicks in, and she just turns in a circle, one leg madly kicking while the other just sticks out rigidly.

So, we play in the shallows a lot, where I can hold her and coach her. When she’s calmer, she can exert some mastery over that uncooperative left leg and arm. Right now, she frog kicks. Once she has mastered that, we’ll work on a bicycle kick.

And when she’s ready, we climb back on the jet ski in search of another stretch of river to explore. We stop and let a water moccasin swim past, not twenty feet in front of the jet ski. I point it out to Katy, and reassure her that there is nothing to fear. “You don’t have to fear a snake you can see,” I tell her. “Just be careful, and give them room.”

On another bend down the river, a six-foot alligator suns himself on an inviting white sand beach. I cut the jet ski off and drift in the current. I poke Katy and point, and she squeals in surprise, and then starts edging backwards, snuggling closer to me.

Her grandmother has taught her that snakes and alligators and dogs and rambunctious children and God knows what else are things to fear. Things that can knock her down are things to fear. Rough housing is frowned upon, because after all, my daughter is delicate, and handicapped to boot. She could get hurt.

I will not allow my daughter to learn fear.

And so we sit and drift with the current, and I point out to her that snakes and alligators are to be respected and given their distance, but not feared. Strange dogs should be given their distance too, until you know their intentions, but not feared. If a rambunctious or rude child knocks her down, we go play with someone else. But we do not fear them.

And as we get closer, the alligator swims away, just like I told her it would. “Because it’s more afraid of us,” I explain.

And on another stretch of beach, we bury our toes in the sand and have a picnic. We eat fruit cups and ham sandwiches and her favorite, peanut butter and cheese crackers.

I toss a few crumbs into the water, and KatyBeth watches in fascination as the bream swarm from the deeper waters and devour the remnants of a cracker.

I coax her to hold one under the water, and the bream swarm around us like piranhas, eating a peanut butter and cheese cracker right out of her hand. She giggles and squirms as the bolder ones nibble at her feet and legs.

It’s days like this on the river that I live for; a chance to teach my kid what every kid should learn in childhood. Life’s little lessons that she misses out on, because everyone insists on treating her like a China doll.

Puppy teeth are sharp, but puppy slobber possesses magical healing properties.

Trees are a joy to climb, even if it means falling out of them occasionally.

Mud pies are fun to make, but not edible. But go ahead and taste it if you must, Little Miss Hard Head.

Snakes and lizards and alligators are cool, when viewed from a distance.

The outdoors offer a world of wonders to explore, but pack your skeeter repellent and sunscreen.

Peanut butter and cheese crackers are even tastier when you eat them on a beach in the middle of nowhere, and share the leftovers with a school of hungry fish.

Pain only lasts a little while, and bruises fade, but regret lasts a lifetime.

She doesn’t look it, but my daughter is much tougher than people realize. She’s much tougher than she realizes, and that’s what I try to show her. My daughter is the toughest person I know.

She just happens to have a left leg and arm that don’t work so well, but we’re working on that. Probably always will be.

And as the shadows grow long and the crickets start singing and the sun sinks behind the trees, I tell KatyBeth it’s time to go. Naturally, she whines and frets, and she cries when I load her onto the jet ski, but by the time we reach the landing, she’s fast asleep, head resting against my left arm.

I manage to beach the jet ski at the landing, tote her to the truck, remove her life jacket and buckle her into her car seat without even waking her. The drive home is quiet, giving me time to contemplate the sunburn I’m going to have in an hour or so. My shoulders are already tightening. To make matters worse, I discover that I’ve had my cell phone in the pocket of my swim trunks the entire time. It’s ruined.

At the house, I manage to back the jet ski trailer into the garage without KatyBeth for a spotter, and I tote her inside like a sack of potatoes, limp and still sleeping soundly. I lay her on her side of the bed, remove her swimsuit and dress her in panties and the SpongeBob EMS tee shirt she likes to sleep in.

As I tuck her in, she opens her eyes and yawns sleepily, and murmurs, “I want Dora, Daddy.” I fetch her Dora the Explorer doll from the floor beside the bed and she sleepily takes it from me…

…with her left hand.

And that was my day yesterday, well worth the price of gas and a new cell phone.

Comments - Add Yours

  • ERnursey

    Very well worth it. Kids are only kids for a short while, you have to enjoy them while you can.

  • ERnursey

    Very well worth it. Kids are only kids for a short while, you have to enjoy them while you can.

  • Mr. Fixit

    She sounds like a great kid, and you sound like a great dad!Mr Fixit

  • Mr. Fixit

    She sounds like a great kid, and you sound like a great dad!Mr Fixit

  • U.P. Medic

    That sounds like a fabulous day you two had. Absolutely worth the cost of gas and a cell. Those are the days you will think back on when she is driving you crazy with the boys, or wanting the car, and the list goes on and on. Great Post…

  • U.P. Medic

    That sounds like a fabulous day you two had. Absolutely worth the cost of gas and a cell. Those are the days you will think back on when she is driving you crazy with the boys, or wanting the car, and the list goes on and on. Great Post…

  • MedicMatthew

    Mr. Ambulance Driver you are a fortunate man and little KatyBeth is a very fortunate little girl to be blessed with such a Daddy.

  • MedicMatthew

    Mr. Ambulance Driver you are a fortunate man and little KatyBeth is a very fortunate little girl to be blessed with such a Daddy.

  • MarlaQuack

    What a beautiful story!

  • MarlaQuack

    What a beautiful story!

  • MonkeyGirl

    That was very sweet. KatyBeth is the perfect antidote to Paris Hilton. Thank you.And you, sir, are a marvelous man.

  • Babs RN

    Absolutely awesome :)

  • MonkeyGirl

    That was very sweet. KatyBeth is the perfect antidote to Paris Hilton. Thank you.And you, sir, are a marvelous man.

  • Babs RN

    Absolutely awesome :)

  • Joe Allen

    It’s still a bit early yet, but… Happy Father’s Day! You’re a sterling example for other fathers. Thanks for sharing.Joe

  • Joe Allen

    It’s still a bit early yet, but… Happy Father’s Day! You’re a sterling example for other fathers. Thanks for sharing.Joe

  • Squeaky Wheel

    That’s great. :-)

  • Squeaky Wheel

    That’s great. :-)

  • Dick

    She’s a very, very luck little girl. I don’t often regret not having children.

  • Dick

    She’s a very, very luck little girl. I don’t often regret not having children.

  • Mrs. Who

    Absolutely wonderful…the both of you!

  • Mrs. Who

    Absolutely wonderful…the both of you!

  • Kate

    Where did you get Dora the Explorer aqua shoes in your size? *grin*This is a story that Katy will treasure some day – that you love her enough to write down your memory of the day.Thanks, AD, for sharing your day with us, too.

  • Kate

    Where did you get Dora the Explorer aqua shoes in your size? *grin*This is a story that Katy will treasure some day – that you love her enough to write down your memory of the day.Thanks, AD, for sharing your day with us, too.

  • HollyB

    That is an awesome story, to borrow a word fom Babs. And Katy Beth is lucky to have a Daddy like you. But then you are a Lucky Daddy to have been blessed with a Beautiful, smart, STUBBORN daughter. I am one and I have one, so I should know.

  • HollyB

    That is an awesome story, to borrow a word fom Babs. And Katy Beth is lucky to have a Daddy like you. But then you are a Lucky Daddy to have been blessed with a Beautiful, smart, STUBBORN daughter. I am one and I have one, so I should know.

  • Craig D

    Thanks to you, it sounds like she’ll have a lot of experiences most kids never have. Sounds like a really fun day :-)It’s infuriating that we’re supposed to wrap kids in cotton wool now. They’ve trimmed the trees at my old primary school so the kids can’t climb them (which would, after all, be a hazard). How sad is that?

  • Craig D

    Thanks to you, it sounds like she’ll have a lot of experiences most kids never have. Sounds like a really fun day :-)It’s infuriating that we’re supposed to wrap kids in cotton wool now. They’ve trimmed the trees at my old primary school so the kids can’t climb them (which would, after all, be a hazard). How sad is that?

  • Jamie

    You made me cry with envy.:) Your little girl sounds adorable. And she’s lucky to have a dad like you.

  • Jamie

    You made me cry with envy.:) Your little girl sounds adorable. And she’s lucky to have a dad like you.

  • Nancy

    Happy Father’s Day.I envy your daughter, and I miss my dad so…

  • Nancy

    Happy Father’s Day.I envy your daughter, and I miss my dad so…

  • Michael

    Well done. Special moments with ones we love is what life is all about.

  • Michael

    Well done. Special moments with ones we love is what life is all about.

  • Christina

    Thank you for sharing, AD.

  • Christina

    Thank you for sharing, AD.

  • Lin

    You are both heroes! The Terrific Twosome! You motivate her for health and love and she motivates you with and for love. Ain’t kids Grand!?! Thanks for sharing a wonderful day,

  • Lin

    You are both heroes! The Terrific Twosome! You motivate her for health and love and she motivates you with and for love. Ain’t kids Grand!?! Thanks for sharing a wonderful day,

  • Strings

    Wow AD… stories like that should have a warning attached to them. Beautiful! Now, where’s my hanky?

  • Strings

    Wow AD… stories like that should have a warning attached to them. Beautiful! Now, where’s my hanky?

  • Anonymous

    With her left handYES!

  • Anonymous

    YES!

  • Medicmarch.

    Good story, AD. Keep her working that left side!

  • Medicmarch.

    Good story, AD. Keep her working that left side!

  • Bob@thenest

    Thought behind every actionand love behind every thought,the two of you are sooooo luckyto have each other.

  • Bob@thenest

    Thought behind every actionand love behind every thought,the two of you are sooooo luckyto have each other.

  • Brandon

    KatyBeth’s lucky to have a dad like you, a great story!

  • Brandon

    KatyBeth’s lucky to have a dad like you, a great story!

  • Mark

    That was profoundly moving, Sir. Also, it every time I read about a parent like you, who’s raising their child to be an independant, thinking, self-challenging person rather than a permenantly coddled semi-child, it makes me think that maybe – just maybe – the next generation will be OK after all.Thank you.

  • Mark

    rather than a permenantly coddled semi-child, it makes me think that maybe – just maybe – the next generation will be OK after all.Thank you.

  • phlegmfatale

    Remarkable girl! I felt proud of you both, reading this post!

  • phlegmfatale

    Remarkable girl! I felt proud of you both, reading this post!

  • Rusty aka Emma

    If I had to swop my dad for another I would choose you AD. What a awesome story and what a great kid you have.

  • Rusty aka Emma

    If I had to swop my dad for another I would choose you AD. What a awesome story and what a great kid you have.

  • Loving Annie

    You sound like a really good dad, AD. I hope that you keep that story, and give her a copy of it on her 21st birthday, so she can cherish it…

  • Loving Annie

    You sound like a really good dad, AD. I hope that you keep that story, and give her a copy of it on her 21st birthday, so she can cherish it…

  • Mugwug

    Damn you AD, I got work to do and now I’m all teared up.I hope I can be as much as father to my little girl, come what may, as you are to yours.

  • Mugwug

    Damn you AD, I got work to do and now I’m all teared up.I hope I can be as much as father to my little girl, come what may, as you are to yours.

  • night lightning woman

    Many years ago, I met an art teacher who had been born without a right hand. Arm just ended en a nub at the wrist. Her parents, like you, never sheltered or protected her. She turned out to be quite artistic,and loved to teach. So, art teacher. Then she tried to find a job. She told me about an interview with one principal who told her she couldn’t throw pots. Well, she had brought in some examples of what she could do, and she nodded towards the pottery jug she had brought. “I made that,” she said. Gut the man wouldn’t believe his own eyes. She eventually found a job and was gloriously happy teaching. She said she was simply reared to never accept limits because of the way she was made. And she was having a wonderful life. Bet Katy will, too.

  • night lightning woman

    Many years ago, I met an art teacher who had been born without a right hand. Arm just ended en a nub at the wrist. Her parents, like you, never sheltered or protected her. She turned out to be quite artistic,and loved to teach. So, art teacher. Then she tried to find a job. She told me about an interview with one principal who told her she couldn’t throw pots. Well, she had brought in some examples of what she could do, and she nodded towards the pottery jug she had brought. “I made that,” she said. Gut the man wouldn’t believe his own eyes. She eventually found a job and was gloriously happy teaching. She said she was simply reared to never accept limits because of the way she was made. And she was having a wonderful life. Bet Katy will, too.

  • Jean

    You should be cloned, sir.Your daughter is blessed to have you as her father. May you have many, many beautiful days like this.

  • Jean

    You should be cloned, sir.Your daughter is blessed to have you as her father. May you have many, many beautiful days like this.

  • Don Gwinn

    Whoa . . . what a day!

  • Don Gwinn

    Whoa . . . what a day!

  • Brandon

    After my daughter was born, my mother gave me a framed stitching that read, “Any man can be a father, but it takes someone special to be a Daddy.Good job, Daddy. Way to create a great memory for your little girl!

  • Brandon

    .Good job, Daddy. Way to create a great memory for your little girl!

  • Anonymous

    You both are inspiring!WELL DONE!Gunsmoke

  • Anonymous

    You both are inspiring!WELL DONE!Gunsmoke

  • Scott

    Wow!

  • Alexis

    My 8th grade history teacher was born with osteogenesis imperfecta. She never topped 4 feet in height, her wrists were bent at odd angles, and every fall could kill her. She also kicked my ass in miniature golf for an entire summer. She brought in her “hippie” pictures when she had long hair, flowers, and Donovan albums.She brought in pictures of her as a child. Rather than keep her at home wrapped in cotton, her parents sent her to public school, even when both her legs were broken from climbing onto the couch (her sister pulled her in a padded red wagon). And then she decided to become a public school teacher, and no one in her family batted an eye. They knew she could hold her own.Of all things, she died years later of a heart attack, shoveling snow (with the child-sized shovel she kept in the garage). I still miss her. I imagine KatyBeth will be just as tough as my teacher. And we’ll all look up to her just as much.

  • The Hotfessional

    You are obviously a very extraordinary man. Kiss that little one for all of us.

  • Alexis

    My 8th grade history teacher was born with osteogenesis imperfecta. She never topped 4 feet in height, her wrists were bent at odd angles, and every fall could kill her. She also kicked my ass in miniature golf for an entire summer. She brought in her “hippie” pictures when she had long hair, flowers, and Donovan albums.She brought in pictures of her as a child. Rather than keep her at home wrapped in cotton, her parents sent her to public school, even when both her legs were broken from climbing onto the couch (her sister pulled her in a padded red wagon). And then she decided to become a public school teacher, and no one in her family batted an eye. They knew she could hold her own.Of all things, she died years later of a heart attack, shoveling snow (with the child-sized shovel she kept in the garage). I still miss her. I imagine KatyBeth will be just as tough as my teacher. And we’ll all look up to her just as much.

  • The Hotfessional

    You are obviously a very extraordinary man. Kiss that little one for all of us.

  • armed_and_christian

    Thanks for sharing your day with us! I have a little princess, too, and I cherish every day the Lord has given us together.

  • armed_and_christian

    Thanks for sharing your day with us! I have a little princess, too, and I cherish every day the Lord has given us together.

  • Sevesteen

    I only wish every child had at least one parent like you.

  • Sevesteen

    I only wish every child had at least one parent like you.

  • firefighter girl

    bless you, AD. And bless your sweet girl.

  • firefighter girl

    bless you, AD. And bless your sweet girl.

  • Morpheus

    I’m deeply moved. Thank you.

  • Morpheus

    I’m deeply moved. Thank you.

  • John McElveen

    Cool! Are you Blessed or what??Whata girl!J

  • John McElveen

    Cool! Are you Blessed or what??Whata girl!J

  • The Tundra PA

    AD–been lurking your current posts and archives for a while now, but this post touched me hard, and I have to de-lurk and tell you how much I enjoy your writing and your voice. This story is beautiful, and I am typing through the tears in both eyes to tell you so. Yes, as others have said, KatyBeth is lucky to have such a great dad, and you are lucky to have such a strong and determined daughter. I hope you will submit this post to Grand Rounds. That audience needs and deserves to find it.And I hope that you will continue to share such extraordinary writing with us. Thank you.

  • The Tundra PA

    AD–been lurking your current posts and archives for a while now, but this post touched me hard, and I have to de-lurk and tell you how much I enjoy your writing and your voice. This story is beautiful, and I am typing through the tears in both eyes to tell you so. Yes, as others have said, KatyBeth is lucky to have such a great dad, and you are lucky to have such a strong and determined daughter. I hope you will submit this post to Grand Rounds. That audience needs and deserves to find it.And I hope that you will continue to share such extraordinary writing with us. Thank you.

  • Anonymous

    AD, you did it again. Went and made a grown man cry damn you. Im gonna go tell my little one how much daddy loves her now. Damn you.Lonnie

  • Anonymous

    AD, you did it again. Went and made a grown man cry damn you. Im gonna go tell my little one how much daddy loves her now. Damn you.Lonnie

  • Kevin

    THIS is why I read this blog.Just… damn!

  • Kevin

    THIS is why I read this blog.Just… damn!

  • Anonymous

    AD KatyBeth wants you to listen to this! http://play.rhapsody.com/fiveforfighting/twolights/ijustloveyou?didAutoplayBounce=trueHere are the lyricshttp://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/fiveforfighting/ijustloveyou.htmlthumbody

  • Anonymous

    AD KatyBeth wants you to listen to this! http://play.rhapsody.com/fiveforfighting/twolights/ijustloveyou?didAutoplayBounce=trueHere are the lyricshttp://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/fiveforfighting/ijustloveyou.htmlthumbody

  • Ambulance Driver

    Tundra PA, how does a fellow go about submitting a post to Grand Rounds? I’ve got a couple more that might be worthy.

  • Ambulance Driver

    Tundra PA, how does a fellow go about submitting a post to Grand Rounds? I’ve got a couple more that might be worthy.

  • Anonymous

    Beautiful. Thanks for sharing.femme d’espoir

  • Anonymous

    Beautiful. Thanks for sharing.femme d’espoir

  • Lester

    ADSorry my links didn’t work. Check out the song by Five for Fighting titled I Just Love You. I believe Katy wants You to hear this songthumbody from The High Road(a Daddy of 2 wonderful girls

  • Lester

    ADSorry my links didn’t work. Check out the song by Five for Fighting titled I Just Love You. I believe Katy wants You to hear this songthumbody from The High Road(a Daddy of 2 wonderful girls

  • Ambulance Driver

    Thanks for the links, Thumbody. I’m a big fan of Five for Fighting, and now thanks to you, I’ve downloaded another of their songs from I Tunes. Thanks!

  • Ambulance Driver

    Thanks for the links, Thumbody. I’m a big fan of Five for Fighting, and now thanks to you, I’ve downloaded another of their songs from I Tunes. Thanks!

  • Anonymous

    wow AD that brought a lump to the throat great story great Kid great Dad.(D) EMT

  • Anonymous

    wow AD that brought a lump to the throat great story great Kid great Dad.(D) EMT

  • Kimberly

    You’re an awesome dad. I’m looking for a good baby daddy, I think you’ll do just fine. They’d be cute kids. :)

  • Kimberly

    You’re an awesome dad. I’m looking for a good baby daddy, I think you’ll do just fine. They’d be cute kids. :)

  • David

    You’re both so lucky to have each other.Great story.

  • David

    You’re both so lucky to have each other.Great story.

  • Misty

    I was led to your blog site through my love of the water and wanting to read a story about an interesting water adventure.What I got was much more profound. Thank you for sharing your story and articulating it so well. The love you and your daugther feel for one another is unmistakable and genuinely puts a smile back into the world.

  • Misty

    I was led to your blog site through my love of the water and wanting to read a story about an interesting water adventure.What I got was much more profound. Thank you for sharing your story and articulating it so well. The love you and your daugther feel for one another is unmistakable and genuinely puts a smile back into the world.

  • Scottsdale Girl

    YAY for more father daughter stories on the innernets.Awesome story AD. Thank you.

  • Scottsdale Girl

    YAY for more father daughter stories on the innernets.Awesome story AD. Thank you.

  • Fran

    You are lucky to have each other! And yes, you made me cry again!

  • Fran

    You are lucky to have each other! And yes, you made me cry again!

  • Kevin

    What a touching story. Reading this was a great way to start this set of nights. Thank you for sharing.

  • Kevin

    What a touching story. Reading this was a great way to start this set of nights. Thank you for sharing.

  • The Tundra PA

    AD–many of your posts are Grand Rounds-worthy! Here is the process. Grand Rounds is hosted by a different medblogger each Tuesday morning. The schedule of upcoming hosts (and the archive of past hosts) is maintained by the creator of Grand Rounds, Dr. Nick Genes, on his blog Blogborygmi. Click on the link for whoever has the following Tuesday’s GR. That will take you to the upcoming host’s site, where you will learn (perhaps with a bit of scrolling) what date and time the host has chosen as the submission deadline and whether the host plans to utilize a theme or simply to take all comers. There will also be directions for submitting, usually just sending an email to the host with the words “Grand Rounds” in the subject line and the link to your post in the body of the email. Then you sit back and wait breathlessly until Tuesday morning to see if you were included. IMHO, that will probably be every time you submit. On the Tuesdays when you are included, your sitemeter will jump noticeably; if you decide to host GR (which I strongly encourage) your sitemeter will go nuts! Next week’s host is Codeblog: Tales of a Nurse and her submission deadline is Sunday night. Submit! Submit! Submit!{grin} I love your stuff…

  • The Tundra PA

    and her submission deadline is Sunday night. Submit! Submit! Submit!{grin} I love your stuff…

  • farmgirl

    This one about made me cry, not because of her disability but because you both work so hard to overcome it. Call it tears of pride that there are still people out there who work on things instead of giving up.Kudos to you both and give Katy an extra hug for me. And if she ever gets the urge to ride a horse, let me know.

  • farmgirl

    This one about made me cry, not because of her disability but because you both work so hard to overcome it. Call it tears of pride that there are still people out there who work on things instead of giving up.Kudos to you both and give Katy an extra hug for me. And if she ever gets the urge to ride a horse, let me know.

  • poody

    ok so I am welling and spilling sitting here reading this and I realize I have a crush on you too! What a wanderful daddy you are! What a wonderful kid you have. You are truly blessed!

  • poody

    ok so I am welling and spilling sitting here reading this and I realize I have a crush on you too! What a wanderful daddy you are! What a wonderful kid you have. You are truly blessed!

  • Skylers Dad

    Hi there, I wondered over because of a tip from a friend, great story my friend. My son has CP also, his name is Skyler, and is the light of my life!

  • Skylers Dad

    Hi there, I wondered over because of a tip from a friend, great story my friend. My son has CP also, his name is Skyler, and is the light of my life!

  • Shannon

    My daughter has right hemiplegia…complete with the neoprene hand brace (and people always ask how they “hurt themselves, don’t they) and a DAFO. Your post was beautiful…exactly how I feel about my wonderful daughter. Beautiful writing, much better than I could ever express myself.

  • Shannon

    My daughter has right hemiplegia…complete with the neoprene hand brace (and people always ask how they “hurt themselves, don’t they) and a DAFO. Your post was beautiful…exactly how I feel about my wonderful daughter. Beautiful writing, much better than I could ever express myself.

  • *Sarah*

    How amazingly touching! How lucky she is to have a father that loves her so much and shares such a special connection. I hope she gets to read this story someday.

  • *Sarah*

    How amazingly touching! How lucky she is to have a father that loves her so much and shares such a special connection. I hope she gets to read this story someday.

  • Tiffany

    Your daughter sounds like an amazing girl. She is lucky to have a father like you. My son has some challenges to overcome as well, and I know it takes patience and work to get them to do things themselves. But – it is more than worth it! I wish you both all the happiness in the world.

  • Tiffany

    Your daughter sounds like an amazing girl. She is lucky to have a father like you. My son has some challenges to overcome as well, and I know it takes patience and work to get them to do things themselves. But – it is more than worth it! I wish you both all the happiness in the world.

  • Steph

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  • Steph

    Hi, I really like your blog. It deals with the same theme as our blog, sharing stories and experiences about our lives and the lives of the people around us. Please check out our blog here I hope to hear your thoughts.

  • Steph

    I hope to hear your thoughts.

  • Steph

    I hope to hear your thoughts.

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  • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/TT2LFJKNWICP2COEYHIH2OGIRU Tammy

    Thank you for reminding me why I am a foster and adoptive parent. I hope to be as good a parent as you one day. I am inspired to work on my patience and think of the potential the future holds. Thanks again!

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  • Mwhooley

    Kelly, where’d you get the adult Dora the Explorer aqua shoes?