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About

By day he is a mild-mannered paramedic, writer and educator. At night, wearing his multi-pocketed EMS pants, he transforms into Ambulance Driver, a trauma-fighting superhero who prowls the dark streets and seamy underbelly of the city in search of little old ladies who have fallen and can’t get up.

  • ginnygraves

    Hi -

    My name is Ginny Graves, and I'm writing an article for READERS' DIGEST on things emergency medical professionals know but typically don't tell patients. The story is going to cover everything from who gets bumped to the top of the E.R.'s waiting list and why to things that really annoy E.R. docs and nurses and inside info that ambulance drivers and EMTs know. Would you have 10 to 15 minutes to chat on the phone about it one day this week? I'm outside San Francisco and am typically at my desk from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. PST. But I'd be happy to work around your schedule. Let me know a time that would be convenient for you. I'd be grateful for your input.

    Many thanks,
    Ginny Graves
    415-454-1807

  • kellie

    Hey…..any one have any idea where Crystal “MCknob” has gone? Her blog and twitter account are gone..totally worried about her..I adored readng her! Please email me…thanks…
    Kellie
    kjr1117@aol.com

  • kellie

    Hey…..any one have any idea where Crystal “MCknob” has gone? Her blog and twitter account are gone..totally worried about her..I adored readng her! Please email me…thanks…
    Kellie
    kjr1117@aol.com

  • Mark Kendall

    AD,
    My name is Mark Kendall, I am a first semester paramedic student in the St. Louis area. I've been assigned a research paper on “the future of EMS,” we have to choose something in EMS that we feel will be introduced or will change in the future. After reading some of your ongoing discussions on airway management with rogue medic i've decided to choose that for my topic. I'm looking for some good research regarding intubation success in the field, the effectiveness of rescue airways such as king tubes and combi's. If you could help me out I would really appreciate it.
    Thanks,
    Mark Kendall
    makendall89@yahoo.com

  • Mark Kendall

    AD,
    My name is Mark Kendall, I am a first semester paramedic student in the St. Louis area. I've been assigned a research paper on “the future of EMS,” we have to choose something in EMS that we feel will be introduced or will change in the future. After reading some of your ongoing discussions on airway management with rogue medic i've decided to choose that for my topic. I'm looking for some good research regarding intubation success in the field, the effectiveness of rescue airways such as king tubes and combi's. If you could help me out I would really appreciate it.
    Thanks,
    Mark Kendall
    makendall89@yahoo.com

  • http://gunholsters.com/ Jeanette K.

    Hi there,
    I love your blog and wanted to share a story with you. However, I don’t see your contact info listed. Please contact me with the information below. Thanks!

  • jouleman

    Your project is likely well intended Ginny. But…you have offended about 90% of EMS providers already in your request for “inside” info. Normally it would roll off my back because people are just stupid. In your case however, it would seem since you are trying to present yourself as a professional writer, that you would have done a bit more research in reference to our proper titles, prior to your request. We are professionals as well. We are not “ambulance drivers”. That and the old “strong back, lead foot” mentality went out the window long ago. We are Paramedics and EMT's. We are an educated bunch. I went to school 2 years to be a Paramedic. I do happen to drive an ambulance occasionally in the performance of my job, but it is much more involved than that. We are the front lines and the extended hand of the physician in dealing with an acutely ill or injured patient. And based on our in depth knowledge of pre-hospital emergency medicine in the performance of our job, we are looked to and held to a standard of expectation in the performance of that job by the patients we care for and the physicians we work under. The white smock wearing, door slapping days of both “drivers” running to the front of the truck of the 1940's – 1960's and hauling ass to the hospital with the patient in back alone are long gone. Do an article or at least research EMS first so you are familiar with us. Then you can cautiously ask us for “inside info” once you know who your asking. I personally wouldn't tell you anything.

  • ginnygraves

    So sorry to offend you! I hope you enjoy the article more than my e-mail. I
    was delighted to be able to chat with many kind, thoughtful EMTs and
    paramedics for the piece. Look for it in an upcoming issue of Reader's
    Digest. Should be in the March or April issue.
    All best,
    GG

  • ginnygraves

    So sorry to offend you! I hope you enjoy the article more than my e-mail. I
    was delighted to be able to chat with many kind, thoughtful EMTs and
    paramedics for the piece. Look for it in an upcoming issue of Reader's
    Digest. Should be in the March or April issue.
    All best,
    GG

  • http://www.physician.com/ Anna Huges

    Hi,
    I am The editor/writer with physician.com. I really liked your site and i am interested in building a relationship with your site. We want to spread public awareness. I hope you can help me out. Your site is a very useful resource.

    Please email me back with your URl in subject line to take a step ahead and also to avoid spam.

    Thank you,
    Anna Huges
    editorial.physician@gmail.com
    http://www.physician.com

  • (-_-)

    you seem mean

  • ghm0445

    Hi;

    I just read your “50 Secrets…” after my wife, an RN and CRNA, asked me what I think about it. I was shocked. Either you selected the most patient-hostile comments or paraphrased them into such or we really have such cold uncaring medical personnel in our ERs. If so, the hospital she works at, is an exception, as are other ERs I have had need to utilize. – Instead of telling some “secrets” that are worthwhile to know you presented a bitch column. You have depicted Emergency Medical personnel as cold-hearted and mean. Most patients coming to an ER are hurt and confused; they need care not just attention, and understanding that in their state they may not be their most reasonable. It is good to know that the ER world is not as bad as you portray its personnel. They deserve a better image. – However we hope we never fall into the (non-)care of most of the contributors to your article, especially not into the hands of Dr. Allen Roberts of Ft Worth.

    GM

  • Ambulance_Driver

    Um, I think you have the wrong blog. I never wrote any such article.

    And for what it's worth, Allen Roberts is one of the most respected physician bloggers on the web.

  • http://roguemedic.blogspot.com/ Rogue Medic

    ghm seems to be commenting on the article by Ginny Graves in Reader's Digest. It is a list of one line comments that people in emergency medicine and EMS wish patients knew.

    http://www.rd.com/your-america-inspiring-people

    To summarize, you should not use EMS/ED for non-emergencies; you should answer questions honestly and completely; you should not expect concierge level care.

    If you read the comments looking for something to complain about, you can find something to complain about. It boils down to the golden rule. Treat others as you would wish to be treated yourself.

    Here is one example – 24. “Get rid of your entitlement mentality. It’s bad in your general life but really bad in the ER. We’ll treat you, but we might not be nice.” —Allen Roberts, MD

    How can you argue with that. If you are going to the ED to be drowned with sweetness, you should consider going someplace else.

    Drug seekers (junkies) are also criticized, as they should be. Drug seekers cause patients with legitimate pain to be denied appropriate treatment. There is nothing nice about that.

  • Ambulance_Driver

    Ahhh. Now that I've read the column, I know what she's talking about. Ginny Graves asked me for a quote, but I never got back to her.

    Still, pretty mild stuff. I've certainly posted harsher stuff than that right here on the blog. Seems like GHM is one of those people looking for a reason to be offended.

  • Ambulance_Driver

    Um, I think you have the wrong blog. I never wrote any such article.

    And for what it's worth, Allen Roberts is one of the most respected physician bloggers on the web.

  • http://roguemedic.blogspot.com/ Rogue Medic

    ghm seems to be commenting on the article by Ginny Graves in Reader's Digest. It is a list of one line comments that people in emergency medicine and EMS wish patients knew.

    http://www.rd.com/your-america-inspiring-people

    To summarize, you should not use EMS/ED for non-emergencies; you should answer questions honestly and completely; you should not expect concierge level care.

    If you read the comments looking for something to complain about, you can find something to complain about. It boils down to the golden rule. Treat others as you would wish to be treated yourself.

    Here is one example – 24. “Get rid of your entitlement mentality. It’s bad in your general life but really bad in the ER. We’ll treat you, but we might not be nice.” —Allen Roberts, MD

    How can you argue with that. If you are going to the ED to be drowned with sweetness, you should consider going someplace else.

    Drug seekers (junkies) are also criticized, as they should be. Drug seekers cause patients with legitimate pain to be denied appropriate treatment. There is nothing nice about that.

  • Ambulance_Driver

    Ahhh. Now that I've read the column, I know what she's talking about. Ginny Graves asked me for a quote, but I never got back to her.

    Still, pretty mild stuff. I've certainly posted harsher stuff than that right here on the blog. Seems like GHM is one of those people looking for a reason to be offended.

  • slinky9

    Hey AD.. I thought you might enjoy this. It's a 5-year-old girl who speaks to the 911 dispatcher after her father is stricken with chest pain and difficulty breathing. She was so calm and composed. Almost brought a tear to my eye when she was comforting her dad.

    http://www.youtube.com/v/eDARfDJw80s

    (I'm sure KatyBeth would do the same in that situation)

  • slinky9

    Hey AD.. I thought you might enjoy this. It's a 5-year-old girl who speaks to the 911 dispatcher after her father is stricken with chest pain and difficulty breathing. She was so calm and composed. Almost brought a tear to my eye when she was comforting her dad.

    http://www.youtube.com/v/eDARfDJw80s

    (I'm sure KatyBeth would do the same in that situation)

  • terilynvik

    A whole 2 years of school? WOW. That's the equivalent of an AA and youcan't get far with that. In fact, after 17 years as a 9-1-1 Dispatcher I know hundreds of paramedics and they make all of 14 bucks an hour to be with patients for a few minutes on the worst day or last day of their life. There is really no chance of promotion and they burn out quickly. You spend most of your time driving and sitting in quarters.Large egos, low pay and ridiculous hours. At least this writer is trying to give folks the inside scoop to get better service. Proper titles? Please, go back to school and get a title that pays a living wage.

  • ladymedic

    I've been a medic for almost 15 years. I know a lot of medics and a lot of dispatchers. Terilynvik, you sound every bit as arrogant as you are accusing jouleman of being. It's EMS. None of us have any control over the call volume or the type of calls that come in. We are all required to go to school in order to do our jobs and we are all required to continue our education in order to keep our jobs.
    EMS workers are among the lowest paid medical personell in the country and yet we are called upon on a daily basis to do a job that is worth a lot higher pay. If you are working for a 911 agency, you are required to respond at all hours to calls that are seldom what they are dispatched as and to scenes that often are just as life threatening to us. Yes, we often stage for law enforcement as a precaution but they cannot control 100 percent of the scene 100 percent of the time. If you are working for a private ambulance service, you are expected to know You're job, the nurse's job, and somedays it seems everybody else's job as well. We go to school, we work for very little pay and we have to put up with well intentioned people who think all we do is drive an ambulance all day until they are the ones on our stretcher. At that point, the same people who think we drive too fast think we are not going fast enough. They often make that clear while throwing up on us. The roads near the hospitals are often the worst and the families think they know your job better than you after watching a few episodes of the latest medical drama.
    Then there are the dispatchers who don't seem to get the accurate information so that the patient who they dispatched as “medical call” because they really have no clue, is actually a cpr in progress upon our arrival on scene.
    Yes, we burn out easy and there's little chance of promotion. When we finally get the promotion we know longer want it but take it for the increase in pay. So why don't you get your own attitude in check and remember, if you ever require an ambulance, the crew may very well have read your post.

  • windrose

    I thought this might tickle everyone's fancy: (new pain chart example)

    http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/2010/02/b

  • Paula

    How about “A Day in the Life of an Ambulance Drivers Wife” !!! I love you Kelly. And Miss you tremendously! You never call or anything! PG

  • http://www.bioshieldtech.com Randy

    My name is Randy with Bio Shield Technologies. We are a company that provides sanitizers, disinfectants, cleaners and antimicrobial protected coating technologies to schools, public safety offices, and individuals wishing to keep themselves clean. We pride ourselves on being on the cutting edge of antimicrobial protection.

    We were doing research about cleanliness in the medical field when we came across your blog. We were really impressed with the quality of credible information you are providing to your readers, based upon your expertise. We especially like how you add your own personal touch to the scientific information, which makes your posts not only informational, but entertaining!

    We were wondering if you would at all be interested in some sort of cross promotion. We are looking for ideas for posts on our own blog and thought that we maybe able to help each other out. We would be willing to feature your website on our blog as a means to increase awareness of health issues. In return we would ask for a similar post on your blog, directing to us, those who need disinfectants. We feel that this is a great opportunity for both websites since a lot of people are not aware that there are items that will shield an area from micro bacteria for 24 hours even exists. We would welcome any feedback, suggestions, ideas you may have!

    Thanks,
    Randy

  • http://www.bioshieldtech.com Randy

    My name is Randy with Bio Shield Technologies. We are a company that provides sanitizers, disinfectants, cleaners and antimicrobial protected coating technologies to schools, public safety offices, and individuals wishing to keep themselves clean. We pride ourselves on being on the cutting edge of antimicrobial protection.

    We were doing research about cleanliness in the medical field when we came across your blog. We were really impressed with the quality of credible information you are providing to your readers, based upon your expertise. We especially like how you add your own personal touch to the scientific information, which makes your posts not only informational, but entertaining!

    We were wondering if you would at all be interested in some sort of cross promotion. We are looking for ideas for posts on our own blog and thought that we maybe able to help each other out. We would be willing to feature your website on our blog as a means to increase awareness of health issues. In return we would ask for a similar post on your blog, directing to us, those who need disinfectants. We feel that this is a great opportunity for both websites since a lot of people are not aware that there are items that will shield an area from micro bacteria for 24 hours even exists. We would welcome any feedback, suggestions, ideas you may have!

    Thanks,
    Randy

  • http://www.emspromag.com Ron Whitney

    Dear Ambo,

    Love your writing style, EMS PRO is interested in publishing some of your articles. Please call me at 877-768-5550, or email me ron@emspromag.com.

    Regards,
    Ron Whitney

  • http://www.emspromag.com Ron Whitney

    Dear Ambo,

    Love your writing style, EMS PRO is interested in publishing some of your articles. Please call me at 877-768-5550, or email me ron@emspromag.com.

    Regards,
    Ron Whitney

  • 911MedicChick

    are you being serious? when you need an ambulance… please just call a friend (if you have any) to drive you to the hospital… or better yet, just walk. This is a perfect indication of how we are disrespected until we're needed. and then, there we are regardless of all the disrespect to treat you, take you to the hospital and maybe even save your life. Bet you wouldnt leave the hospital talking about how big our egos and crappy our paychecks are then!

  • NeedleNerd

    Absolutely!

  • Deeannmariee

    Dang, that was good. I’m gonna print that and use it..not the first one but the second one..LMAO

  • Nate

    Between your book (which I have read and re-read several times) and this blog, you are rapidly becoming my hero. If every your travels take you to upstate South Carolina, I feel it is my duty to buy you a beer. Or several.

  • http://twitter.com/EMTFFG Cynthia

    Hey, Ambulance Driver, let me know when your book goes into a book, because I would be REALLY interested in reading it. I’m a Junior EMS Explorer in an EMS Explorers program right now, age 16. I would look forward to reading your book. Thanks, ~EMTFFG .

  • MichelleCL

    Hi, Ad! I was reading some of your back post, and one inspired me to write about what kids watch on TV. I’m taking Stinkerbelle’s side on it! http://drmcomeslast.blogspot.com/2011/01/re-verbatim-conversation-with-six-year.html I have no idea how to do those cute one word hyperlinks everone does. Back to studying chemistry at work….

  • http://drmcomeslast.blogspot.com/2011/01/re-verbatim-conversation-with-six-year.html MichelleCL

    Not sure if last weeks went through. I was reading an older blog note of yours and had a response to it. Too big to post here, but I only used you and your Younin’s screen names. Safety first! Thanks for the inspiration. Mine is more a blogette, for myself mostlly. The MCAT has a written part, and I’m brainstorming for my essay for med school. I’m hoping to take the EMT-B class next spring or summer. Mainly because I think every help professional should start with the same fram of reference and work from there. And we don’t. Hope you get some recoil therapy in soon! (http://ambulancedriverfiles.com/feb_network_search_context=blog&s=verbatim+conversation+with+a+six+year+old+this+morning I’m still learning how to make those cute hyperlinks).

  • Emt2paramedics2424

    Kelly, I am not sure if you will remember me or not, but I used to work with you at AMR in Monroe, La. My name is Matt Smith. I just recently put 2 and 2 together when I was reading one of your articles in EMS Magizine. I then searched for your blog and love it. I am going out to find and buy your book this weedend. Nice to see you are doing well. Btw, i work as a Paramedic for Manatee County in Florida now, no longer in La.

  • Renee Roberts

    Hey Kelly,

    How about a little reciprocal blog-love? I put you in my blogroll… :-)

    Renee Roberts
    http://www.backofthemedic.com

  • Anonymous

    Linked!

    Sorry it took me so long!

    Ambulance Driver

  • Pat Walling

    Hey Ambulance Driver! I love your blog, it’s pretty funny (although periodically depressing- people can be so dumb, and I fear the worst of it comes out when there is, or they think there is, an emergency..). I was wondering if you did guest posts?

    • Anonymous

      Not very often, Pat, and then only with writers I know. Sorry.

      Ambulance Driver

      • Pat Walling

         That makes sense. Doesn’t hurt to ask right? Thanks for letting me know.

        -Pat

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Sean-Johnson/842449453 Sean Johnson

    Wow, talk about your small worlds! I just happened to find this site last night on shift and have been stuck on it and listening to the newbie podcasts.  Now I find out that we have a mutual friend,,,Jeremy Koonce! He said you used to be his relief,,,Koonce and I have been friends for years,,lol.  Amazing

  • Simon

    In response to seeing this everywhere on facebook recently:

    Somewhere a paramedic is being yelled at for taking too long to get there; trying to save the life of a total stranger; holding their bladder because their Radio just went off; starving because they missed a meal; having to keep a stone face at an accident scene where there’s 2 dead kids; and now its 4 am, and they’re missing THEIR family while taking care of YOURS. Re-post if you are a paramedic, love a paramedic, or appreciate a paramedic. You all know who you are….

    I preferred this version:

    A more accurate version
    Somewhere a paramedic is being yelled cos they deserved it; trying to save the life of a total stranger because thats their job; holding their bladder because they drink too much coffee; starving because they they can’t pack a sandwhich; having to keep a stone face at triage cos they’re not welcome; and now its 4 am, and they’re missing THEIR sleep because they don’t like office work.

  • Carolynpinker

    Your post “But, But… It’s For Your Own Good!” really made me question the ethics of that type of drug test. Thanks for questioning. Would it be okay if I used a portion of the post for a new blog post my writing team would be creating in the future?

    Thanks!

    Carolyn Pinker

    • Anonymous

      Sure, just link with attribution, please.

  • Nana

    I bid on a custom kilt (for my beloved SIL…who wore a rented one when he married my DD) … but it’s showing a different charity (something for kids…definitely not prostate-related). Can you clarify? I want credit to go to the right place!

    • Anonymous

      The auction for the custom kilt is to benefit kid’s cancer, not prostate cancer. It’s a charity our Kilted to Kick Cancer sponsor Alt.Kilt supports, and so do we.

      We’re perfectly happy with you bidding to support this very worthy cause.

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  • Katie

    I bought your book today and I’m almost done! I”m considering going to Basic Emt school this summer and your book is an inspiration!

    Katie Labbe
    New Iberia, La.

  • Amanda

    Kelly when I try to access your site from my phone it doesn’t take me to the mobile version anymore, just to the main website. Did you take the mobile option away? Because it was really nice and handy..

    • Anonymous

      Working fine on my IPhone, Amanda, but I’ll forward this to the IT guys.
      Kelly Grayson

  • Amanda

    Hey Kelly just wanted to pop by and say we’ll be at the SC EMS symposium this weekend and can’t wait to meet you. We’ve been reading your blog for a few years now and have read and re-read your book countless times. We would love to join you for a drink or dinner Saturday night if you’re available. See you Saturday!

  • Kyukidojen

    I’ve got a question about patient welfare so to speak.  Last fall, I was home after several weeks in the hospital (and enough operations to last several people for a life time) being treated for an abcess on my leg.  Despite the antibiotics I was still taking, I went into septic shock and my husband ended up needing to call for an ambulance.  First responder on duty that day happened to be our neighbor, so he was there within minutes.  He was clearing the bathroom, moving our clothes hamper and portable shelving, so that when the parmedics arrived they’d have room.  In the process, he knocked over the cat box and it spilled out across the floor.  (Or so says my hubby; I don’t remember any of it)
     
    Enter paramedics.  First thing they noticed after they got inside was the litter on the floor.  The dirty, used cat litter.  So once we got to the hospital, one of them submitted whatever it is that gets submitted when there is concern for a patient’s living conditions.  Rightfully so in my opinion – she believed I was living in a house where we just throw litter on the floor and let the cats make a mess.  Our home is quite clean, truthfully, but she couldn’t have known how things looked before I took out the bathroom furniture with my ribs, yakked where I landed and then again in the bathtub, and the neighbor spilled the litter.

    My question is how you make the choice to inform someone else about any concerns you may have about a patient’s home?  Or do you not ever bring it up?  Just a curiosity thing, and haven’t found any reference to the topic yet.

    • Kyukidojen

      And for the record:  the prehospital care I received was outstanding.  They fixed my husband’s panic-itis, cleaned me up before loading me up, and got me to the hospital still alive.  I kind of think caring for the panic-itis is probably a lot tougher than administering IV’s and oxygen to an unconcious but small normally healthy person.

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  • Brandon Murphy

    Hi,

    We are teaming up with Blauer.com for a giveaway! Blauer is the leading provider for Police And we wanted to see if you would be interested in blogging about an experience that you might have had using a Blauer product. If you have not, that’s okay too! You could also write about a product that you are interested in using. We are doing an Blauer Bag Giveaway with lots of great stuff!

    If you are interested please a post about your experience/write about a product that you’re dying to try~!

    To Qualify the Requirements are:
    1. 300-500 words
    2. 1 link to the main webpage (www.Blauer.com)
    3. 1 link to the product that you have used or would like to try out (http://www.blauer.com/law-enforcement/outerwear/high-visibility-outerwear.html)
    4. This much be 100% duplicate free

    When you have posted this article, please email ThuyVy@submitdigital.com and provide her with the URL so that she can enter you.

    This giveaway will start Wednesday July, 11th and the winning blogger will be selected on August 31, 2012. We will enter in the URLs and randomly choose a winner. The winner will be contacted via E-mail no later than September 14, 2012. When you are contacted she will ask your for your info as to where to mail the Blauer Bag giveaway!

    We wish you the best of luck!!

    Brandon Murphy

  • crs224akameema

    Under the headline “Women’s Gun Show A Big Bang” in our local paper: http://www.registerstar.com/articles/2012/07/22/news/doc500b725538ead693803068.txt
    Some good comments, and one that supports the stand against stronger gun controls.

  • Joe Galizio

    I’m Joe Galizio. I have just finished writing a children’s book called “Don’t Be Afraid.” As a volunteer EMT on Long Island, I have seen quite a few fires and accidents involving children. I have also visited many schools to help educate children about emergency workers, the gear we wear and use, and how to act during emergencies.
    I’ve come to find that children are often scared of us and our tools, especially when involved in an incident. My book is to help educate kids not to hide from us, and to become familiar with a lot of the tools we will use during these emergencies. I launched a Kickstarter campaign in hopes to get this project launched and am looking for professional opinions, advice, and assistance spreading the word. Please let me know what you think, and if you have any advice, I would be glad to hear it.
    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/611795399/dont-be-afraid
    Thank you for your time.
    – Joe Galizio

  • Kerry
  • Karen

    I am not sure if this will come out right. I found your blog via trolling a bunch of nursing in the er and other medical blogs, I have some experince in the medical field enough to understand most of the conditions discussed and the types of patients seen. I have read extensively, thru years of archives, 4 or 5 different ER nursing blogs, and I just had to stop, really. I understand the stress and drama and ridculousness of ER patients, but the bitterness, hatefulness and rancid name calling by the nurses was just too much. I know this will unleash a barrage of hatred, but if you are somewhat happy with your career, can you let it show every so often?? Your blog was the first one I read about EMTs and I was blown away, not only by the crazy stories, and the nutty patients, but also by the way you write and present things, and about your daughter and the difficulties you faced and overcame. Even when it was a story that didn’t cast you in the best light you told it. I just want to say thanks for letting peek into your life.